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ISSN : 2233-4165(Print)
ISSN : 2233-5382(Online)
Journal of Industrial Distribution & Business Vol.9 No.1 pp.77-88
DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.13106/ijidb.2018.vol9.no1.77.

Roles of Consumer’s Social Relationship and Perceived Justice Type on Service Recovery Satisfaction

Nak-Hwan Choi**, Su-Min Park***, Ah-Young Lim****
**Frist Author, Professor, Department of Business Administration, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea. Tel: +82-63-270-2998, E-mail: cnh@jbnu.ac.kr
***Master, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea. Tel: +82-63-270-4147, E-mail: psm8976@naver.com
****Corresponding Author, Lecturer of Department of Business Administration, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea. Tel: +82-63-270-4147, E-mail: sophie00@hanmail.net
October 13, 2017. December 1, 2017. January 15, 2018.

Abstract

Purpose – Past research has not given much attention to the roles of consumers’ social relationship type in the effects of justice type of service failure recovery alternatives on their satisfaction to the alternative exposed to them. Current research aimed at exploring the moderation role of consumers’ social relationship central versus peripheral in the effects of justice types of service failure recovery alternatives on the recovery satisfaction, and this research also explored whether the level of satisfaction to interaction justice-focused alternative are significantly different between the two, their social relationship central and peripheral relationship.
Research design, data, and methodology – 2(social relationship central versus peripheral) between-subjects design was employed. 50 participants for each experimental group there were. Participants of each group took forceful steps in choosing one between the procedural justice-focused alternative and the distribution justice-focused alternative. χ2-analysis was used to verify that the number of choosing each alternative becomes different between the two experimental groups, and a one way ANOVA was used to verify that the extent to which participants are satisfied to the alternative chosen by them becomes different between the two groups.
Results – The number of participants choosing procedural justice-focused alternative at the group of social relationship central was larger than that at the group of social relationship peripheral, whereas the number of participants choosing distribution justice-focused alternative at the group of social relationship peripheral was larger than that at the group of social relationship central. And the level of satisfaction to procedural justice-focused alternative at the group of social relationship central was higher than that at the group of social relationship peripheral, whereas the level of satisfaction to distribution justice-focused alternative at the group of social relationship peripheral was higher than that at the group of social relationship central. In addition, the level of satisfaction to interaction justice-focused alternative was not significantly different between the two groups.
Conclusions – Marketers should give attention to the type of justice when developing alternatives by which consumers’ service failure can be recovered. They should suggest procedural justice-focused alternative to consumers under social relationship central, whereas they should develop distribution justice-focused alternative for consumers under social relationship peripheral. And in the process of recovering service failure they also should focus on interaction justice.

JEL Classifications: C83, L81, M31, P46.

서비스실패의 회복방안에서 지각된 공정성유형의 회복만족도효과에서 소비자의 사회적 관계의 역할

최낙환**, 박수민***, 임아영****

초록


 

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